Green building renovation update. Insulation!

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We’re still working diligently on the new Clean Air Gardening building, getting it ready for a move in in August or September. You might have seen our previous post about renovating the building for LEED and Energy Star certification.

 Here’s an insulation product that we are looking at for the ceiling of the building. Does anyone out there have any opinions about this, or suggestions about similar products that are similarly priced and available in Dallas?

I am drawn to this product because it offers LEED credits in several different ways, including “recycled content.”

Monoglass Spray-On Insulation

Monoglass® Spray-On Insulation is a combination of elongated, recycled-cullet glass fibers and water-based, nontoxic adhesives that can be spray-applied to virtually any surface or configuration. Without additional support, Monoglass can be applied overhead to a maximum of 5″ (R-20) and applied vertically to 7″ (R-28). Monoglass is white in color, noncombustible, and can be applied over fireproofing. Monoglass contains no formaldehyde and does not support fungal growth or encourage infestation by pests.

LEED Credits:

EA Prerequisite 2 – Minimum Energy Performance

EA Credit 1 – Optimize Energy Performance

MR Credit 4 – Recycled Content

Our architect says:

R values are additive, so what you have there now gets better and better with each inch of insulation. Remember, in this part of Texas, 90% of the solar heat load is on the roof. I guess that is a long way of saying I think you should do as much insulting as budget and deadload permit.

FYI, I discovered this product by buying a subscription to BuildingGreen.com, which is totally worth the money.

And as long as I’m giving credit where credit is due, I discovered BuildingGreen.com in the book I recently purchased, The Lazy Environmentalist. Note that the link goes through to the main page of the free blog. Here’s the page about the book.

Want to know the coolest thing about the book, in my opinion? Clean Air Gardening is actually mentioned on page 188! Woo hoo!

As always, please share in the comments if you have experience with this type of insulation, or if you have other ideas for insulation for a large commercial building that will generate LEED credits.

Don’t limit yourself to insulation issues though! Get creative and go to our original building renovation post and leave us some suggestions on making our building green.


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